Salesforce flashes their wearables wardrobe

At the recent Dreamforce 2014 convention in San Francisco, hosts Salesforce showcased Google Glass, Samsung Gear and other similar wearables. “This is an incredibly hot topic. We see this as the next mobile revolution,” said Salesforce’s global director of strategic partnerships and business development. Read more from Frédéric Demierre, blue-infinity Practice Manager, Salesforce about these exciting developments.


Salesforce, the leader in cloud computing, has regularly been on the cusp of new computing and related services trends, for example their app store for integrated applications, adding social networking within its products and revamping its smartphone technology. Now with the focus on wearable devices, Salesforce has joined the race, evident from their recent investment in wearable startups and a drive to get developers to make applications that connect couple Salesforce’s technology with devices worn on the face, wrist and body.

At the recent Dreamforce convention in San Francisco, Salesforce showcased Google Glass, Samsung Gear and other similar product applications and devices. “This is an incredibly hot topic. We see this as the next mobile revolution,” said Lindsey Irvine Salesforce’s global director of strategic partnerships and business development. Salesforce’s interest in wearables demonstrates that the company is becoming a vital computing platform that other developers can use to access customers or actually run their own businesses. Wearables are just one emerging technology that brought attention at Dreamforce, and are part of Salesforce’s larger goal of capitalizing on the so-called Internet of Things, which is all about big data and various insights that they promise in days to come.

To help fill their tech shop window, Salesforce, lead by CEO Marc Benioff (pictured),  in June launched Salesforce Wear to encourage developers to create more enterprise applications for wearable devices, with support for devices from Samsung Electronics Co., Google and Pebble. Initial response from companies has been strong both developmentally and in using wearable apps, and Salesforce last month said it was collaborating with devices from Epson, Jawbone, Meta and Facebook’s Oculus virtual reality headset.

Currently, there are apps like one that connects field technicians with experts through video cameras in headsets and automatically updates Salesforce case files; one for remote monitoring of medical patients’ vital signs; and one for automatically recognizing faces of trusted care providers through a headset camera, which could help with Alzheimer’s. The San Francisco sessions included presentations from wearable experts from Google, which has developed the much ballyhooed Glass smart-glasses.

A concrete example of a Salesforce Wear reference app is "Today," a sales productivity app Salesforce built for the Samsung Gear 2 that schedules meetings and provides at-a-glance information about who's attending and what topics will be covered. For the Pebble smartwatch, Salesforce Wear provides a reference app for Web traffic and sales analytics. For Google Glass, Salesforce Wear provides a reference app for field service workers.

Salesforce Wear is now generally available and included with all user licenses of Salesforce CRM and the Salesforce Platform. Now, the more than 1.5 million Salesforce1 developers can kick-start their ability to connect companies with their customers in entirely new ways through wearable apps. Enterprise developers can immediately access a growing library of devices, sample code, documentation, demonstrations and reference apps to learn from. 

blue-infinity is the biggest Salesforce/ competency center in Western Switzerland, providing Professionals services around Sales and E-business solutions.

Frederic Demierre is blue-infinity Practice Manager, Salesforce

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About the author

Frédéric Demierre
Frédéric Demierre